Working with Visitor Posts in the Timeline of a Class, School, or District Facebook Page

September 17, 2015

[Note: This post is geared for people who are starting out as Facebook Page administrators, managing a class, school, or district social media presence via an organizational Facebook Page.]

Icon of One Cartoon Head in profile talking to another

By Terry [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

You may have set up a class, school, or district Facebook page to connect with your audiences on social media. Maybe you created it as a page which is managed by a single–or limited number–of individuals to ensure that the page is content is moderated & reflects your social media & organizational standards. Maybe you’ve been moderately successful getting it of the ground for pushing out information, but are missing the interactivity people in your audiences have come to expect from social media.

One day you find that Visitor Posts are popping up on your organizational Page in a box entitled “Visitor Posts”. Congratulations! Someone’s listening and you’ve made contact. How do you respond?

You have two main tasks: determine whether the content posted aligns with your organization’s (class, school, or district’s) objectives and mission and/or serves its community? If not, click on the down arrow to the right of the post’s account name and you’ll find the options to:

  • Hide from Page
  • Delete from Page
  • Report post
  • Embed post
  • Turn notifications (off or on so you can know when comments are added)

Your decision will depend on the content you see. If the content is clearly spam or offensive, go ahead and report the post. If the post is irrelevant, or not useful for your organization at the time, but you want to be able to see it later as the administrator, hide it from your audience using Hide from Page. If the content the other account posted in your Visitor Posts is relevant and useful to you or your audiences, let it keep it showing on your Page in the Visitor Post section.

But maybe that Visitor Post is so good you’d like to do more to connect with it, the person or organization behind that other account, and share. What do you do now?

  • Like the post as your organizational Page identity.
    1. You may have a personal/professional identity on Facebook separate from the identity of the organization whose Page you manage. You want to keep this personal/professional identity separate from your actions as the organization’s (class, school, district’s) account that you are managing on Facebook. Make sure you are liking the post with your appropriate identity. To do this look in the shaded bar directly below the specific post in the Visitor Posts section. There will be an icon/avatar to the right of the “Like   Comment” with a dropdown arrow. If the icon/avatar is your personal/professional & not your organizational one, be sure to switch it.
    2. Remember “liking” implies and endorsement, so you might want to do a little reconnaissance on the Facebook account that posted to your Visitor Posts section BEFORE you like it. What or whom you “like” in Facebook terms reflects on the professional/organizational reputation of your page. For example, if an account posts something kind about your Facebook Page content, and you visit that account’s page only to find slews of racist jokes posted there, think twice about “liking” that particular account’s Visitor Post and building seeming endorsements of that account’s content.
    3. Also, feel free to add a thankful or useful comment to the Visitor’s post if you feel so inclined. Interacting with it, boosts its presence in your Visitor Posts area.
  • Share the content in your organizational Page’s timeline.
    1. Click on the day & time beneath the Visitor Post’s identity in your Visitor Posts section. This takes you to the original Visitor’s post.
    2. Below the content of the post is a bar with “Like Comment Share”. Click on Share.
    3. You have 3 options: Share Now (only Me), Share…, or Send as Message. Click on Share…
    4. You are taken to the “Share this [Link, Status, Photo, etc.]” window. Below the title of the window, use the drop down list to select the timeline you want to share it to: On your own Timeline, On a friend’s Timeline, In a group, On a Page you manage, in a private message. Select “On a Page you manage”
    5. This brings up some additional options. You will see two boxes that help you specify where the target Timeline is by selecting the Page you manage and the identity with which you are posting. Ensure that both boxes are set to the correct organizational Page, and the correct identity you want to use to share it in your organization’s Timeline.
    6. You’ll have an option to add a comment in the Share before it posts up to the Page Timeline. Feel free to post a thank you or other relevant comment.
    7. Below the content of the Visitor’s Post that you share, you have additional options for having the share be “Public” to all, or to limit your audience.
    8. Once your settings are correct, click the Share Link button in the lower right.

Hope this helps you as you begin to manage an organizational Facebook Page. If you have any other hints for newbies, feel free to share them here.

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Professionalism & Web 2.0

June 22, 2009

It’s posts like this from Digital Education, “Teachers banned from Twitter after indescreet tweet” that get me concerned about the lack of professional development around web 2.0 technologies for teachers.  If you’re not familiar with the situation, a Scottish teacher known as a tech leader in a rural district tweeted , “Have three Asperger’s boys in S1 class: never a dull moment! Always offer an interesting take on things”. This caused a ruckus with the district & community. Read the Guardian article for more detail here.  So what does the district do but BAN the use of twitter & blogging by teachers although they may access other teachers blogs, etc.  It is my belief that there are a significant number of teachers and educational professionals using social networking tools, who don’t have a solid grasp re. how social networking services replicate information–so that you can only delete your original but the replicants are still out there–or the reasons why they should separate their professional & personal social networking identities. Often many do not understand the permanency of electronic communication until it is too late and their careers are impacted.

Here was my response to the Digital Education post, “No Tweets for Scottish Teachers.”

Are teachers allowed to discuss their work? Of course. That said we have a professional responsibility to protect the best interests of the students under our care.

ETHICAL HUMAN RESEARCH STANDARD

From the Guardian article it appears that the teacher identified the students as being hers, being in her S1 class, & having the specific condition. The article also states that she is in a rural community. Now if it’s like our rural districts here in Canada, that type of description would not meet ethical human research standards–as it is likely I could readily identify the students from the given information.

NATURE OF SOCIAL NETWORKING & TWITTER

There is also a comment in the article that the teacher only “sent to people she regarded as personal friends”. Was her Twitter account public or private? If public, anyone logging on to the internet page with that teacher’s account name would see the information–and if the teacher completed an online public profile–those students could be identified without too much difficulty. Was it sent as a DM (direct message) to those “others” with an expectation of privacy or not? If not, the others could RT (retweet) the message–and anyone following the “others” would see it and could then similarly RT it. If it was a DM–everyone who uses direct messaging needs to understand (in any social networking or collaborative software)–those only have an “expectation” of privacy. Anyone could cut and paste that DM content into a tweet and repost it–not ethically perhaps but not everyone is ethical 100% of the time. Once those messages enter the twittersphere–or any social networking application that allows replication & transmission of content–there is no going back. You can delete your contribution–but if it has been replicated by anyone on your network–you no longer have control of that piece.

BOTTOM LINE

All users of social networking–teachers, students, parents, administrators–need to know how the software works so that they can consciously use it to support student & professional development. What we need is more professional development around web 2.0 tools so people can use them in a conscious and informed professional manner–not prohibitions. I have seen several mistakes by professionals like this likely well-intentioned teacher simply because they didn’t understand HOW social networking works and what the ramifications might be re. content posted there. I have begun to develop & deliver workshops on Digital Footprints for educators and students alike for this very reason. If you are interested contact me. Happy to share what I know.


Shifting Landscapes of ProD Wiki

June 22, 2009

Awhile back, Sylvia Currie asked if I might present a poster session with her & Betty Gilgoff at the Canadian e-Learning Conference in Vancouver in June 2009.  (Sylvia is  a consultant &  the Manager of Community Services with BCcampus Online.  Betty Gilgoff is the Inservice Faculty Associate for Field Programs at Simon Fraser University. ) Unfortunately, due to various commitments I was unable to attend in person but was able to contribute to their Wiki for the session.

Please take a look at our wiki, “Shifting Landscapes of Professional Learning” http://shiftinglandscapes.pbworks.com/

My section dealt with my journey of twitter adoption/use in conjunction with delicious:  “Using Twitter (and Delicious) for Professional Collaboration, Development, and Instruction”  http://shiftinglandscapes.pbworks.com/Using-Twitter-(and-Delicious)-for-Professional-Collaboration%2C-Development%2C-and-Instruction

Let us know what you think….